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Civil Unrest Statement

The Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations (OIIR) acknowledges the hurt and heartache from the recent documented murders of Black community members by different police departments as well as by other civilians. The video of George Floyd’s atrocious murder at the hands of Minneapolis Police Department officers has unfortunately become a common sight in the age of social media. Mr. Floyd is just one example of lethal state sanctioned violence against the Black community that spans the country from coast to coast. Sadly, Tony McDade, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and Nina Pop are recent examples. It is important to note that not all Black deaths have been reported or received the proper acknowledgement, and not all Black deaths have prompted this level of outrage, but all Black deaths are worthy of this type of energy. There also ongoing injustices facing marginalized people including violence against LGBTQ+ folks, mass deportations of undocumented communities, COVID-19 fueling anti-Asian racism and xenophobia. These are the struggles of the students that OIIR directly serves and has to combat on a daily basis.

These acts of violence against members of the Black community have a long, unforgivable history in the United States and are only more known to the masses due to them being shared on social media. Continuously watching such unfathomable violence can take a toll on one’s spirit and mental psyche. The vicarious trauma from watching the deaths of Black civilians can be triggering to have these images and videos consumed all across feeds, especially for Black communities. As such, we would like to share some resources to help process your wide-ranging feelings including but not limited to anger, helplessness and sadness. We are and have always been resilient. Take up space and process in the ways that feel most meaningful to you. Black people: we see you and we love you dearly. “Caring for [yourself], is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare” – Audre Lorde. Your existence and resistance is a revolutionary act.

Below are some resources for students, faculty and staff as we process this pain:

Asian American Cultural Center

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/aacc

Phone: 217-333-9300

Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/bnaacc

Phone: 217-333-2092

Counseling Center

Website: http://counselingcenter.illinois.edu/

Phone: 217-333-3704

CU Trauma Resiliency Initiative

Website: https://www.facebook.com/CUTraumaResiliency/

Phone: 217-673-7122

Diversity and Social Justice Education

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/diversityed

Phone: 217-265-5585

International Education

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/cultural-resource-centers/international-education

Phone: 217-300-0463

La Casa Cultural Latina

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/la-casa-cultural-latina

Phone: 217-333-4950

LGBTQ+ Freedom Fund

Website: lgbtqfund.org 

LGBTQ Resource Center

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/lgbt-resource-center

Phone: 217-244-8863

McKinley Health Center

Website: https://mckinley.illinois.edu/

Phone: 217-333-2700

MN Specific Resource From Grassroots Organizers: 

Website: https://docs.google.com/document/u/0/d/1fb2cioBcCO47L_oGPsjdGVWDAc3RTHU2tIpDtekWKs0/mobilebasic

Native American House

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/native-american-house

Phone: 217-265-0632

Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu

Phone: 217-333-1300

Women’s Resources Center

Website: https://oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center

Phone: 217-333-3137